Announcing the 2017 Finalists!

The LightHouse for the Blind couldn't be more proud to announce our elite group of ten finalists for the inaugural Holman Prize, chosen from over 50 semifinalists and 200 applicants, plus a “Peoples’ Choice” finalist who we honor for receiving the highest number of YouTube ‘likes’ for his ambitious idea. These finalists will all be in the running to make their ambitions a reality when our Holman Committee meets in San Francisco this June. Read more about them below, and stay tuned for more announcements about the winners!

Ahmet Ustunel, who lives in San Francisco, plans to take a solo kayak journey across the Bosphorus Strait from Europe to Asia. To prepare, he proposes to develop his non-visual kayak guidance system over the course of several months, including several voyages around San Francisco Bay, practicing a total of 500 miles over the course of the year before embarking for Turkey.

Caroline Kamaluga lives in Zomba, a city in the Southern Region of Malawi, where women and especially blind women are lucky if they receive sufficient education. One of these fortunate few, Kamaluga proposes to give back to her community by developing a mentorship for blind girls throughout the country. Currently an elementary school student teacher, she hopes to foster a new sense of strength amongst the girls of Malawi.

Jamie Principato is a physics student from Colorado who wants to show the world that rocket science is within reach for blind and low vision students who have a motivation to thrive in the sciences. Jamie is developing a series of workshops called Project BLAST, which will use adaptive technology to allow blind students to send high altitude balloons to the outer limits of the stratosphere.

Muttasim Fadl, who lives in Baltimore and trains blind and low vision students here in America, wants to return to his home country of Sudan and give back. Over two months of travel through the country, Muttasim would like to deliver both valuable tools, such as white canes, as well as lectures, in order to enable blind students to succeed in their pursuits.

Ojok Simon, who lives in rural Uganda, wants to create jobs where they are not available. A beekeeper by trade, Ojok wants to train blind and visually impaired people in his community to build and maintain their own bee farms and to inspire a future generation of apiary entrepreneurs.

Peggy Chong calls herself "The Blind History Lady." Based in New Mexico, Chong has a passion for uncovering stories about great blind individuals, much like James Holman, whose stories might go otherwise without note into the annals of history. Chong proposes to travel throughout America, visiting archives and collecting information about these individuals who might have at one time been Holman Prize contenders themselves.

Penny Melville-Brown, from the UK, has a baking show unlike any other. She proposes a whirlwind itinerary across the world in which she visits culinary experts both blind and sighted, cooking together, talking about food and documenting it all on video. Brown would like to make "Blind Baking" a household name.

Rachel Magario, who was born in Brazil and now lives in Colorado, has a passion for exploration, and with a travel show all her own, she hopes to document how blind people experience the world in a format that is fascinating for any audience. Like a blind Anthony Bourdain, Magario proposes to trip around North America this year, landing herself in some unlikely spots and crafting a fun, relatable narrative about how blind people explore.

Saghatel Basil has ambitions of peace in the Middle East. After growing up in Syria, Lebanon and Armenia, and now residing in Sweden, Saghatel wants to embark on a path of peacekeeping trainings around Europe that will allow him to give back to those uprooted by various conflicts in the Middle East.

Tony Llanes believes that blind folks can have a crucial role in maintaining the infrastructure and safety of his home, the Philippines. An amateur radio operator, Tony proposes to train a cadre of blind individuals to build a radio network that will serve as a lifeline in times of natural disaster. Prone to extreme weather, earthquakes and other fast-acting crises, Tony's project would turn blind radio operators into valuable agents of disaster relief.

Peoples' Choice Finalist: Felipe Rigoni Lopes has big ambitions to become the first blind president of Brazil. Though Felipe's educational journey has been largely funded through scholarships, he applied to the Holman Prize to raise awareness and help propel other blind individuals who find themselves drawn to participate in politics.

Announcing our 2017 Semifinalists!!!

In our inaugural year, the Holman Prize received over 200 applications from 28 countries around the world. Watching our applicants' videos was a joy, and their ideas blew us away. Deciding on a list of semifinalists proved to be difficult for our team. 

Today we couldn't be more excited to share with you our list of semifinalists for the 2017 Holman Prize. Find a list of their names below, and click on each one to watch their pitch video.

ImanSaghatelDan B.• JamesJoshuaJohnGeorgieMelanieJack & Dan • PeggyArneChristinaAngela DeniseBrettMuttasimIoanaNatalieRiikkaNicoleJenniferCarolineYvesMarty • MirjanaAbigail • TonyFelipeAlex L.RachelDan M.LinnPennyGraham • LauraNino & MarieDan P. BoonsiriDenSerenaJamieAlex S. Jana S. • Kaiti • OjokChandniGaryPennDeonAhmetPoonamChristopher